Where is Energy Innovation Heading?

Join the University of Geneva and the MIT Energy Initiative for a discussion on energy challenges, and how energy innovation in academia, policy, and industry can provide answers.

Event Details

Location

swissnex Boston
420 Broadway, Cambridge , Massachusetts 02138 United States

Date

November 09, 2017 from 6:00 am to 9:00 pm America/New York (UTC-04:00)

Cost

Free

Join the University of Geneva and the MIT Energy Initiative on November 9th at swissnex Boston for a discussion on the energy challenges and how energy innovation in academia, policy, and industry can provide answers.

The event will be kicked off with a keynote by Francis O’Sullivan, Director of Research at the MIT Energy Initiative, which will be followed by a panel of additional experts from academia, the private sector, and government policy.


By 2050, the global population will demand roughly 80% more energy than it does today. Meeting this growing demand poses a tremendous challenge, especially given the need to dramatically reduce emissions to avoid the worst effects of climate change. To do this, we must scale up low carbon energy while increasing energy efficiency. In particular, the share of renewable energy should continue to grow and therefore we will need new ways to manage and govern our energy systems, to finance their upfront costs, and to maximize their multiple benefits.

Given the uncertain times we see in today’s global governance and decision-making regimes, energy innovation offers the best chance for solving the urgent and interrelated problems of worldwide insecurity over energy supplies, rapidly growing energy demand, and climate change. But if we are to achieve a timely transition to reliable, low-cost, low-carbon energy, the energy innovation system must be significantly improved. Creating an innovation system to produce sustained and timely advances across a range of energy technologies is challenging, especially in this era of budget cuts and fiscal austerity. To discuss how we can concretely improve these innovation systems, we have invited an esteemed panel of energy experts to share their insights from the perspectives of academia, industry, and government policy.


PANELISTS

  • Dr. Francis O’Sullivan, Director of Research for the Energy Initiative, MIT
  • Dr. David Parra, Senior Researcher and Teaching Assistant, University of Geneva, Institute for Environmental Sciences
  • Sarah Bresolin Silver, Assistant AG for Energy, Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office
  • Peter Luessen, Division Engineering Manager at Energy Grid Tie, Parker Hannifin
  • Katherine MacDonald, Director of Strategic Partnerships, GreentownLabs (Moderator)
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